Pittosporum Tobira
Pittosporum Tobira
Scientific Name: pittosporum tobira 

Inventory  
Container Size (Gallons) Quantity
5G 204

Description

Shrubs or small trees to 6 m tall. Young branchlets lenticellate. Leaves clustered at branchlet apex, biennial; petiole ca. 2 cm; leaf blade dark green and shiny adaxially, dull after drying, obovate or obovate-lanceolate, 4–9 × 1.5–4 cm, leathery, lateral veins 6–8-paired, connected at margin, sometimes reticulate veins conspicuous between lateral veins, base narrowly cuneate, margin entire, revolute, apex rounded or obtuse, usually emarginate or slightly cordate. Inflorescences terminal or near so, umbellate or corymbose; bracts lanceolate, 4–5 mm; bracteoles 2–3 mm; pedicels 1–2 cm; flowers fragrant. Sepals lanceolate, 3–4 mm. Petals free, white at first, becoming yellow later, oblanceolate, 1–1.2 cm. Stamens dimorphic: filament 2–3 mm and anther nearly sterile in reduced stamens; filament 5–6 mm and anther yellow, oblong, and ca. 2 mm in fertile stamens. Ovary long ovoid, densely pubescent; placentas 3; ovules numerous, in 2 rows. Capsule globose, angular, ca. 1.2 cm in diam., dehiscing by 3 valves, ± pubescent; pericarp yellow-brown and shiny adaxially, ca. 1.5 mm thick, woody, horizontally striate; stipe 1–2 mm. Seeds numerous, red, angular, ca. 4 mm; funicle ca. 2 mm. Fl. Mar–May, fr. May–Oct. Source: Encyclopedia of Life

Factoid

This shrub is a common and hardy landscaping plant. Many cultivars have been developed, including dwarf forms and the popular 'Variegata', which has variegated leaves. It is used for hedges, living privacy screens, and indoor and outdoor planter boxes. The stems, leaves, and dried fruits are used in flower arrangements. Source: Wikipedia

 

 

   
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